Push for Full Concurrent Receipt is Renewed in the 115th Congress

January 13, 2017

MOAA continues to lead the effort to end the disability offset to retired pay and strongly supports a plan to phase out the disability offset for all disabled retired servicemembers, with initial priority for those who were prevented from serving 20 years solely because they became severely disabled in service. This issue has been and remains one of MOAA's top legislative priorities.

Concurrent receipt means to receive both service-earned military retired pay and VA disability compensation. Up until 2001, any retired servicemember who also received VA disability compensation had an amount equal to the VA compensation deducted from his or her military retired pay.

Since then, MOAA has pushed hard in Congress to get the authority for concurrent receipt greatly expanded so that the offset was eliminated for retirees with non-combat disabilities rated at 50 percent or higher.

“Even though we still have more to do, this ranks as one of MOAA's most important legislative achievements,” said Col. Mike Barron, USA (Ret), Director of Government Relations at MOAA.

As the new 115th Congress has been sworn in on Capitol Hill, companion concurrent receipt bills have been introduced in both houses of Congress.

In the House, Rep. Sanford Bishop (D-Ga.) reintroduced H.R. 333, the Disabled Veterans Tax Termination Act, and Rep. Gus Bilirakis (R-Fla.) reintroduced H.R. 303, the Retired Pay Restoration Act. Both bills essentially seek to change the law and permit eligible retirees with disability ratings less than 50 percent to receive full concurrent receipt. H.R. 333 also targets support for Chapter 61 retirees with less than 20 years of service.

With the retirement of former Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, two new members of the Senate have stepped up to introduce legislation. Sens. Dean Heller (R-Nev.) and Jon Tester (D-Mont.) introduced S. 66, The Retired Pay Restoration Act.

MOAA will work closely with these members and others in Congress as well as with DoD and the new administration to phase out the disability offset, with initial priority for those who were prevented from serving 20 years solely because they became severely disabled in service.

 

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