Member Books for January 2017

NONFICTION

Sinoland: The Subversion of Freedom’s Bastion. By Lt. Col. Henry J. Poole, USMC (Ret). Posterity Press. ISBN 978-0-98186-598-0.

Heavily illustrated and footnoted, Sinoland offers an exciting, though somewhat disturbing, view of Communist China’s progress in an ongoing 4th Generation Warfare (4GW) attack against America. This book provides partial proof of the People’s Republic of China incursions within U.S. borders for 34 different categories of nonmartial 4GW. 

These all are the subsets that can be easily imagined by a long-time researcher of Chinese expansion in South Asia, Africa, and South America. There might be more, but harm to America was discovered within every subset. Obviously, some incursions were more serious than others. One or two might only have even been profit motivated.  But, most clearly were intended to undermine the strategic strength of America, as the 15 nonmilitary subsets of the People’s Liberation Army’s “Unrestricted Warfare” treatise would strongly suggest. At some point, they could collectively result in Washington’s subservience to Beijing. 

A Walk with Matthew. By Lt. Col. Keith L Sellen, USA (Ret). Westbow Press, ISBN 978-1-5127-5549-7. 

A Walk with Matthew is a poetic journey through the Gospel of Matthew, written through the lens of a believer who, like every believer, has been grafted into an extraordinary family. The author begins with the Gospel writer’s thesis — that those who believe in Jesus are grafted into the family of the King — and reveals through poetry how the life and teachings of Jesus transform us as they did Matthew and the other disciples.

It is the author’s hope that this book will motivate the reader to engage the Gospel’s message, reflect on the text and meaning of the scripture, understand all the good that the Gospel presents, pursue the transformation of being grafted in to Jesus’ pedigree, and grow more confident in eternal life and joyfully content in this life.

MEMOIR

The Frontline Generation: How We Served Post 9/11. By former Army Capt. Marjorie K. Eastman, Middle Tennessee Chapter. Longbow Six Publishing. ISBN 978-0-99776-156-6.
It began as a personal memoir for her son. Reflecting one day on her 10 years of post-9/11 military service, author Marjorie K. Eastman wanted to capture the lessons and inspiration she’d learned serving beside men and women who represent the very best of what it means to be American: dedication to a job well-done, selflessness, character, and a belief that one person can make a difference. And these servicemembers represent just 1 percent of the American public. Eastman identifies this group as the “Frontline Generation” and notes it is an untapped reservoir of leaders — now back in our communities — who have been strengthened by the unique difficulties of post-9/11 service.

The compelling journey of Eastman’s time in uniform culminates in her final assignment, when she was responsible for the lives of more than 100 servicemembers — men and women — scattered throughout Eastern Afghanistan. Her first-person account of that time is a moving story from personal commitment to the conviction that service — no matter where or how — is the best path to success. She offers lessons on life, leadership, service, and the way for every person to find a role in them.

  ​Eastman’s journal entries further reveal frustrations, inspiration, joy, heartbreak, laughter, purpose, resolve, and the remarkable ways servicemembers came together to solve problems and break boundaries well beyond the heartbreaking day of 9/11. She defines the legacy her Frontline Generation leaves on this country, and encourages readers to think about who they want to be, how they can make a difference, how they can make their lives count. Service is the key. The Frontline Generation abounds with wisdom, compassion, and humor.